Predicting TBI: Prediction rules or judgment?

CT imaging has been overused to evaluate children with blunt head trauma despite associated risks to patients and costs. PECARN developed prediction rules to determine which children are at very low risk for clinically important traumatic brain injury (ciTBI). But how do these rules compare to clinical suspicion? In cases when the clinician had a low suspicion for ciTBI but ordered a CT anyway, this study determined reasoning for obtaining the CT. Continue Reading

Guest Post by Dr. Colette Mull, MD, MA: The Accidental Leader

Todd P Chang
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Todd P Chang

DIvisional Director for Research & Scholarship, Associate Fellowship Director, Division of Emergency Medicine at Children's Hospital Los Angeles
Todd is the Director of Technology for the INSPIRE Network with David Kessler & Marc Auerbach. Todd was formerly the Faculty Advisor and Head Site Administrator for the website's predecessor, pemfellows.com. He lives in Pasadena, CA, with his partner and 2 ridiculous cats that are probably sitting on his head as you read this.
Todd P Chang
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“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” -Nelson Mandela The time is ripe for me to deepen my understanding of the sociopolitical environment in which I practice.  Confession: I am a news junkie… Continue Reading

Pediatric urgent care growing and YOUR future in PEM

David Mathison MD MBA

David Mathison MD MBA

Adjunct professor of pediatric and emergency medicine at George Washington University, Regional medical director at PM Pediatrics
David practiced in the ED at Children’s National for 10 years where he was the director of the pediatric transport team. He is the author of the blue card (ED med dosing) app on iTunes/Android and founded healthEworks LLC in 2010. He continues to contribute articles, workshops, apps, and technology to the field of pediatric emergency medicine.
David Mathison MD MBA

Latest posts by David Mathison MD MBA (see all)

When I started my PEM career 10 years ago, I thought every hospital would eventually have a dedicated pediatric ED where PEM physicians could enhance acute care for children. Now a decade later I’m watching medicine steer in a very… Continue Reading

Using an iPad to Remotely Assess Seriously Ill Kids

Andrea Cruz MD MPH

Andrea Cruz MD MPH

Associate Professor of Pediatrics in Emergency Medicine and Infectious Diseases at Baylor College of Medicine
Andrea is the PECARN site PI for Texas Children’s Hospital and runs the Data Center for the Pediatric Emergency Medicine Collaborative Research Committee.
Andrea Cruz MD MPH

Andrea Cruz (Texas Children’s) and Michelle Macy (Michigan) presented the best PEM-related articles of 2016 at AAP this past October. If you weren’t one of the tens of thousands of people in the room that day, we’re going to be… Continue Reading

How about some time off to reflect?

David Kessler

David Kessler

Director of Clinical Simulation and Pediatric Emergency Ultrasound at Columbia University Medical Center
David is also the research director for INSPIRE (International Network for Pediatric Simulation-Based Pediatric Innovation, Research, and Education). Outside of work, he enjoys spending time with his family, tae-kwon-do, saxophone, and musical theater.
David Kessler

Latest posts by David Kessler (see all)

It’s 8pm and the charts are piling up in the ED – you notice the resident appears tearful.  A probe reveals that she just found out her grandmother passed away.  What do you do next? Reflecting back on my year- i… Continue Reading

Slow is smooth, Smooth is fast but too slow is dead)

Marc Auerbach

Marc Auerbach

Associate Professor, Director of Pedatric Simulation at Yale University School of Medicine
Marc is co-chair of the Pediatric Academic Society’s Special Interest Group on Simulation-Based Research and co-chair of INSPIRE (International Network for Pediatric Simulation-Based Pediatric Innovation, Research, and Education). A self-proclaimed “super geek,” Marc’s research and educational activities leverage technology to improve patient outcomes.
Marc Auerbach

Slow is smooth, smooth is fast Special forces push this concept when training for urban combat.  When we work too quickly we risk making mistakes that  lead to harm.  This is especially true in high stakes but time sensitive situations (battlefield… Continue Reading